Revision [5211]

Last edited on 2015-11-16 20:04:46 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
//Hîratar// **Meldin, Lord Daldor** (1596– ) is a merchant and banker, scholar, statesman, writer, ambassador and translator. He was the son of a wealthy [[Pelargir pelargirean]] merchant, elevated to the Council of Gondor by King [[Tarondor]] who granted him a large estate in recognition of his scholarly achievements and his services as a diplomat. His public career began in 1629. He participated in municipal government of Pelargir as a member of the advisory council, as an ambassador, and in various gubernatorial positions in the city. Although steeped in banking and the luxury cloth trade, he also mastered classical Adûnaic, Quenya and Haradaic; produced orations, commentaries, treatises, polemics, short biographies and erudite translations; and become one of the outstanding Gondorian diplomats of the day.
Deletions:
//Hîratar// **Meldin, Lord Daldor** (1596– ) is a merchant and banker, scholar, statesman, writer, ambassador and translator. He was the son of a wealthy [[Pelargir pelargirean]] merchant, elevated to the Council of Gondor by King [[Tarondor]] who granted him a large estate in recognition of his scholarly achievements and his services as a diplomat. His public career began in 1629. He participated in municipal government of Pelargir as a member of the advisory council, as an ambassador, and in various gubernatorial positions in the city. Although steeped in banking and the luxury cloth trade, he also mastered classical Adûnaic, Quenya and Haradaic; produced orations, commentaries, treatises, polemics, short biographies and erudite translations; and become one of the outstanding Gondorian diplomats of the day.


Revision [5210]

Edited on 2015-11-16 20:04:32 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father **Barahir**, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed such wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Spouting Whale Inn.
After his fathers death, Meldin stepped into the public arena. He became one of the Twelve Good Men, advisors to the heads of the municipal government. For the next eighteen years he was rarely out of the public eye. He held governorships in the countryside, was elected as one of the four Priors of Pelargir, served six different terms in the Priors' advisory bodies, and embarked then on a career in diplomacy, being King Tarondor's ambassador to Umbar and Haruzan several times in 1639–1647. At King Tarondor's behest he was elevated to the [[GovadanGondorim Council of Gondor]] and finally granted the County of Daldor in [[Lebennivet]].
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called //[[RedHand Order of the Red Hand]]//; he became their leader and paragon, called "The Secret Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.
Deletions:
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father **Barahir**, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed such wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Spouting Whale Inn.
After his fathers death, Meldin stepped into the public arena. He became one of the Twelve Good Men, advisors to the heads of the municipal government. For the next eighteen years he was rarely out of the public eye. He held governorships in the countryside, was elected as one of the four Priors of Pelargir, served six different terms in the Priors' advisory bodies, and embarked then on a career in diplomacy, being King Tarondor's ambassador to Umbar and Haruzan several times in 1639–1647. At King Tarondor's behest he was elevated to the [[GovadanGondorim Council of Gondor]] and finally granted the County of Daldor in [[Lebennivet]].
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called //[[RedHand Order of the Red Hand]]//; he became their leader and paragon, called "The Secret Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.


Revision [4855]

Edited on 2011-12-13 19:44:07 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father **Barahir**, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed such wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Spouting Whale Inn.
Deletions:
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father **Barahir**, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed sich wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Sprouting Whale Inn.


Revision [4834]

Edited on 2011-11-03 23:23:33 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
//Hîratar// **Meldin, Lord Daldor** (1596– ) is a merchant and banker, scholar, statesman, writer, ambassador and translator. He was the son of a wealthy [[Pelargir pelargirean]] merchant, elevated to the Council of Gondor by King [[Tarondor]] who granted him a large estate in recognition of his scholarly achievements and his services as a diplomat. His public career began in 1629. He participated in municipal government of Pelargir as a member of the advisory council, as an ambassador, and in various gubernatorial positions in the city. Although steeped in banking and the luxury cloth trade, he also mastered classical Adûnaic, Quenya and Haradaic; produced orations, commentaries, treatises, polemics, short biographies and erudite translations; and become one of the outstanding Gondorian diplomats of the day.
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father **Barahir**, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed sich wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Sprouting Whale Inn.
After his fathers death, Meldin stepped into the public arena. He became one of the Twelve Good Men, advisors to the heads of the municipal government. For the next eighteen years he was rarely out of the public eye. He held governorships in the countryside, was elected as one of the four Priors of Pelargir, served six different terms in the Priors' advisory bodies, and embarked then on a career in diplomacy, being King Tarondor's ambassador to Umbar and Haruzan several times in 1639–1647. At King Tarondor's behest he was elevated to the [[GovadanGondorim Council of Gondor]] and finally granted the County of Daldor in [[Lebennivet]].
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called //[[RedHand Order of the Red Hand]]//; he became their leader and paragon, called "The Secret Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.
====Names and Family====
Meldin has used several names during his career: Meldin Malinaldo, Meldin Barahirion, Meldin Lebennivet (his new family name), and in formal occasions, Lord Daldor.
His niece, **Elemmíriel Lebennivet**, is consort to Lord Mindacil, Warden of Anórien, and former assistant to late Lord Coriayan Falassion.
Deletions:
//Hîratar// **Meldin, Lord Daldor** (1596– ) is a merchant and banker, scholar, statesman, writer, ambassador and translator. He was the son of a wealthy [[Pelargir pelargirean]] merchant, elevated to the Council of Gondor by King [[Tarondor]] who granted him a large estate in recognition of his scholarly achievements and his services as a diplomat. His public career began in 1629. He participated in municipal government of Pelargir as a member of the advisory council, as an ambassador, and in various gubernatorial positions in the city. Although steeped in banking and the luxury cloth trade, he also mastered classical Adûnaic, Quenya and Haradaic; produced orations, commentaries, treatises, polemics, short biographies and erudite translations; and become one of the outstanding Gondorian diplomats of the day.
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father Barahir, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed sich wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Sprouting Whale Inn.
After his fathers death, Meldin stepped into the public arena. He became one of the Twelve Good Men, advisors to the heads of the municipal government. For the next eighteen years he was rarely out of the public eye. He held governorships in the countryside, was elected as one of the four Priors of Pelargir, served six different terms in the Priors' advisory bodies, and embarked then on a career in diplomacy, being King Tarondor's ambassador to Umbar and Haruzan several times in 1639–1647. At King Tarondor's behest he was elevated to the [[GovadanGondorim Council of Gondor]] and finally granted the County of Daldor in [[Lebennivet]].
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called //[[RedHand Order of the Red Hand]]//; he became their leader and paragon, called "The Dark Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.


Revision [4831]

Edited on 2011-11-03 20:41:34 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called //[[RedHand Order of the Red Hand]]//; he became their leader and paragon, called "The Dark Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.
Deletions:
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called "Sons of Men" or the Order of the Red Hand (//Côr Carammaite//); he became their leader and paragon, called "The Dark Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.


Revision [4821]

Edited on 2011-10-28 00:18:49 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
>>""<div class="strike" style="width: 350px;">Count Meldin of Lebennivet, lord Daldor</div><img title="Count Daldor" align="center" src="images/Meldin.jpg">
Deletions:
>>""<div class="strike" style="width: 350px;">Count Daldor of Lebennivet</div><img title="Count Daldor" align="center" src="images/Meldin.jpg">


Revision [4820]

Edited on 2011-10-28 00:17:12 by SampsaRydman
Additions:
>>""<div class="strike" style="width: 350px;">Count Daldor of Lebennivet</div><img title="Count Daldor" align="center" src="images/Meldin.jpg">
<td><font size="2">Lvl 10 Loremaster</font></td>
<td><font size="2">Charismatic, Magical ability,<br>Raving lunatic</font></td>
</tbody></table></center><div class="strike">Lands and estates</div>""
{{image url="images/Daldor2.jpg"}}
Minas Daldor>>======Meldin======
//Hîratar// **Meldin, Lord Daldor** (1596– ) is a merchant and banker, scholar, statesman, writer, ambassador and translator. He was the son of a wealthy [[Pelargir pelargirean]] merchant, elevated to the Council of Gondor by King [[Tarondor]] who granted him a large estate in recognition of his scholarly achievements and his services as a diplomat. His public career began in 1629. He participated in municipal government of Pelargir as a member of the advisory council, as an ambassador, and in various gubernatorial positions in the city. Although steeped in banking and the luxury cloth trade, he also mastered classical Adûnaic, Quenya and Haradaic; produced orations, commentaries, treatises, polemics, short biographies and erudite translations; and become one of the outstanding Gondorian diplomats of the day.
Meldin's family began their social climb in the early fifteenth century, as indicated by a series of well-connected marriages. His paternal grandfather, a banker and moneylender, was the first member of the house to have a term in the Council of Pelargir (1558). But in the next generation, his father Barahir, an extraordinary merchant, traded political place for money by so surrendering himself to the amassing of a great fortune, much of it made in Haruzan, Harondor and Anfalas, that he had too little time for politics and held only minor public offices up to the year of his death (1629). By them, however, he had amassed sich wealth that he came to be seen as one of the richest men in the city, in the very years Pelargir was wracked by civil strife and bloody unrest. His only son Meldin, accordingly, inherited a fortune that made him the social equal, so far as money went, of Morvegil, Dior and Talahir.
In 1621, at the age of twenty-five and rather against his father's will, Meldin turned to a life of austere study, and for the next nine years, working with sages and private tutors, he studied Quenya, classical Adûnaic, and then Haradaic. A dedicated Faithful and a 'fervent controversialist', he used his knowledge of Adûnaic to produce writings aimed at coverting the Umbareans by seeking to prove them wrong. Around 1629, he finally emerged from his studies into marketplace and began to frequent the two meeting points of Pelargirean literati and intellectuals: the Street of the Book Sellers, just north of the //Abad Arahir//, and the Sprouting Whale Inn.
After his fathers death, Meldin stepped into the public arena. He became one of the Twelve Good Men, advisors to the heads of the municipal government. For the next eighteen years he was rarely out of the public eye. He held governorships in the countryside, was elected as one of the four Priors of Pelargir, served six different terms in the Priors' advisory bodies, and embarked then on a career in diplomacy, being King Tarondor's ambassador to Umbar and Haruzan several times in 1639–1647. At King Tarondor's behest he was elevated to the [[GovadanGondorim Council of Gondor]] and finally granted the County of Daldor in [[Lebennivet]].
At the same time Meldin managed to turn the leaders of the Pelargirean aristocracy against him. He was not respectful enough; he tended to speak his mind; and since he was not sufficiently caught up in a patronage web of, he did not frequent power brokers and so was not 'loyal' enough. Pelargir's partisan tax officials cut relentlessly into his wealth, until he was forced to sell his house in the city and permanently relocated himself to Minas Daldor. His mental health started to deteriorate. Meldin became associated with an underground secret society called "Sons of Men" or the Order of the Red Hand (//Côr Carammaite//); he became their leader and paragon, called "The Dark Fire of Númenor". Already deeply involved in classical studies, he started to collect Númenórean antiquities and published several controversial treatises about them.
Deletions:
>>""<div class="strike" style="width: 350px;">Countess Catarina Curimardin</div><div class="strike" style="font-weight: normal;">Widow of <i>hîratar</i> Wilwarin</div><img title="Catarina Curimardin" align="center" src="images/KatarinaCurimardin.jpg" title="Copyright Ann Larimer">
<td><font size="2">Lvl 10 Conjurer</font></td>
<td><font size="2">Calming voice, Magical ability,<br>Animal companions</font></td>
</tbody></table></center><div class="strike">Family tree</div>""[[http://lindefirion.net/charts/sukupuut6.png House of Curimardin]]
""<div class="strike">Lands and estates</div>""{{image title="Copyright Sampsa Rydman" url="images/KAtarinaCurimardin2.jpg"}}
Catarina Curimardin, 1663
{{image url="images/Kissatalo.jpg"}}
Linhirin Kissatalo>>======Catarina Curimardin======
**Catarina Curimardin** (1601- ), joskus kirjoitettu myös Katarina Kurimardin (ad. //kâtha// "kaikkialla" + //rîna// "kruunattu"), on edesmenneen valtaneuvoksen kreivi Morabar Wilwarinin leski, tunnettu hyväntekijä ja oppinut, jolla on yksi Lebenninin suurimmista yksityisistä kirjakokoelmista (ns. //Curimardin-kokoelma//). Hänen veljensä on //hîratar// Arahil Curimardin, Tumladenin herra ja Cumardinien klaanin päämies. Catarina omista mm. Linhirin Kissatalon, johon hän on perustanut kirjurilaitoksen, kirjansitomon (H&H) ja koulun.
Curimardinien suvussa omaisuus on sodan ja kulkutautien vuoksi useaan otteeseen periytynyt naisen puolelta. Tämän on mahdollistanut Gondorin laki, joka antaa mm. isoisälle oikeuden adoptoida lapsenlapsensa. Catarinan isä oli Belfalasista kapinan vuoksi paennut aatelismies Abrazîr, joka menehtyi ruttoon vuonna 1636. Sen jälkeen Catarinan äidinisä Ohtar adoptoi molemmat orvoksi jääneet lapset omikseen, kuten hän oli aiemmin jo adoptoinut samasta syystä siskonsa lapset Ulraedin ja Amrithin.
Kenties tämän erityisen sukuperinteen vuoksi Catarina on tullut tunnetuksi naisten oikeuksien puolestapuhujana ja hän on perustanut Linhiriin erityisen tyttökoulun, jossa kaupungin tytöt saavat ilmaiseksi perusopetusta. Merkittävästä hyväntekeväisyydestään huolimatta kreivitär tiedetään yksityiselämässään syrjäänvetäytyväksi ja hankalaksi ihmiseksi.
Catarina tunnetaan myös intohimoisesta suhtautumisestaan eläimiin, erityisesti kissoihin. Linhirin Kissatalosta kaikki kaupungin kulkukissat ovat saaneet ruokaa ja katon päänsä päälle. Kissojen lisäksi Catarina harrastaa hevosurheilua. Hän omistaa Linhirin maalaiskunnassa lämminverisiä laukkahevosia kasvattavan tallin.


Revision [4819]

The oldest known version of this page was created on 2011-10-27 22:57:31 by SampsaRydman
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